It’s Pi of the Century Day

3.14/15

Better celebrate today, cuz you’ll be dead the next time it comes around. In fact, if you want to maximize your inner nerd, celebrate at 9:26:53 this morning (roughly).

Pi Art Squared

Below is our old friend pi carried out to 768 decimals places, i.e., stopping for a breather at the end of the Feynman Point, a rather odd sequence of six consecutive nines (which does not disprove randomness by the way, thank you for asking):

3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939937510582097494459230781640628620899862803482534211706798214808651328230664709384460955058223172535940812848111745028410270193852110555964462294895493038196442881097566593344612847564823378678316527120190914564856692346034861045432664821339360726024914127372458700660631558817488152092096282925409171536436789259036001133053054882046652138414695194151160943305727036575959195309218611738193261179310511854807446237996274956735188575272489122793818301194912983367336244065664308602139494639522473719070217986094370277053921717629317675238467481846766940513200056812714526356082778577134275778960917363717872146844090122495343014654958537105079227968925892354201995611212902196086403441815981362977477130996051870721134999999.

More Fun with The Merger Verger:

To impress your mom, you can remember Pi to eight decimal places by counting the letters in each word in the following phrase:

May I have a large container of coffee beans? (3,1,4,1,5,9,2,6,5)

About the Art:

The colorful image above is a representation of the first 100 billion digits of pi, developed by Jon Borwein, a mathematician from the University of Newcastle in Australia, and programmer Fran Aragon, who describes it thus: “We wanted to prove, with the image, that the digits of pi are really random. If they weren’t, the picture would have a structure or a repeating shape, like a circle, or some broccoli.”

Courtesy of Wired magazine.

View from the ISS at Night

TMV offers up an absolutely astonishing piece of artistry, courtesy of the International Space Station and a photographic artist named Knate Myers.  The clip has been circulating for a couple of weeks but it’s so good that I wanted to make sure everyone caught it.

Click here to view.  Just under four minutes and well worth it.

“We catch a glimpse of a huge swirl of clouds out the window over the middle of the Pacific Ocean, or the boot of Italy jutting down into the Mediterranean, or the brilliant blue coral reefs of the Caribbean strutting their beauty before the stars. And…we experienced those uniquely human qualities: awe, curiosity, wonder, joy, amazement.”

– Russell L. Schweickart, Apollo Astronaut (“The Home Planet”)